Feedback from Leo and Fleur

I have asked two of my Foundation students to provide me with further feedback. Their key comments are summarised below.

  • There is an interesting dynamic of placing myself as a lens of a camera inside of a machine, which represents cycle
  • Focus on a relationship between ‘me’ and the nature of my work – interaction with references to monotony
  • It is very relevant to the key events of the Corona virus crisis – combination and juxtaposition of chaos and moments of stillness
  • It is necessary to keep the entire cycle in the video to express my creative intention of waiting
  • Consider using a real washing machine as a working object and experimenting with different cycles and programmes.
  • There is a good level of demanding the patience and feeling of entrapment.
  • Leo really enjoyed watching the entire experience, from start to finish, despite understanding how a washing machine works.
  • It is not just about painting – the focus is on the whole experience.
  • Watching the machine work from the inside has shifted the perspective totally and created the division between the inside and the outside.
  • There is a great relevance on the context of the pandemic through the purpose on the metaphorical meaning of cleaning.
  • It is about putting your own meaningful artwork through this process and getting it transformed into something new without having any control over how it will develop.
  • Both, the video and the audio provide appropriate contextualisation.

Interim Feedback

I have asked a group of my Foundation students to watch my Bye Bye Three Monks video. My intention was to receive some constructive feedback from my own learners. I projected the 6minutes and 47 seconds long film on a large screen in the base studio. There was a group of 15 learners available for this experiment.

The key points, which were risen during a plenary session are as follows:

I was waiting for something to happen and felt quite sleepy.

The video was relaxing and hypnotic; calming.

There was a sense of transformation from frustration to relaxation.

Some students felt quite exhausted after watching the vireo, while others found it relaxing and smoothing.

There was a little uncertainty as nothing was happening – concussion regarding the meaning of the piece.

Supporting sound, especially ‘Hugo, Hugo’, adds an element of pace into it.

The film is too long – after a minute, it may become uninteresting. However, later, it becomes enjoyable again.

This feedback has reinforced me in thinking that the video work well and communicates my ideas with sophistication. I may need, however, to support my work with a form of a postcard with appropriate text explaining the context of my investigation. I have used this idea during my most recent exhibition at Art 23 in London and received very positive feedback.

I have enclosed two sound recordings below: